LETTERS OF SUPPORT vs. COMMITMENT

Our Grantseeker Tips Newsletter # 348 addressed the importance of including letters of commitment, not support in your grant proposals. Below we present an example of each type.  Which one do you think would be most persuasive to reviewers?

An actual letter of support that was included with a proposal that reviewers declined to fund.  It is weak, to say the least.

Current Date
Mr. Peter Barnett, Project Director
Organization Name
Street Address
City/State/Zip

Dear Mr. Barnett:
I enjoyed speaking with you today and am familiar with the basic goals and methods of your proposed work towards creating HealthAlertOregon, a statewide advocacy coalition alined to local HealthAlert Coalitions.

I am honored to be part of such a needed and forward thinking project that will work toward expanding and extending coverage to all people inOregon.  Let me know what I can do to facilitate this important partnership endeavor.

Sincerely

Doris Eggerding, MD
University of Oregon

In contrast, consider this stronger letter of commitment.  It indicates what the project director would do to ensure project success.

Current Date
Mr. Peter Barnett, Project Director
Organization Name
Street Address
City/State/Zip

Dear Mr. Barnett:
I was pleased to learn about your project to address health literacy in Oregon, an issue that many health professionals are very concerned about.  I am writing this letter of commitment that the XYZ Health System will partner with you in your grant proposal, Reducing Health Disparities by Improving Health Literacy: A Model for Collaboration.

As you know, we have a network of 128 HealthAlert centers distributed throughout the state.  Collectively, we have more than 300 healthcare professional that are affiliated with our umbrella organization.  We have been serving communities statewide since 1964.  Our tenure has afforded us opportunities to build a strong network of individuals who share the values reflected in this project. Your Health Literacy project represents a continuation of your decade long collaboration on various health-related projects.

We are dedicated to partnering in this project by:
1.  Appointing a represent to the Health Literacy Advisory Council, which would meet semi-annually in Portland for three years to monitor and evaluate the progress of this project;

2.  Provide opportunities for project partners to meet with our staff to obtain input into the development of this project, as needed;

3.  Working with project partners to increase awareness of health literacy in Oregon hospitals by emphasizing project progress in our bi-weekly newsletter and including you prominently in our annual conventions; and

4.  Communicating knowledge gained and relevant products developed through this project to hospitals throughout the state.

We look forward to working with all partners on this grant and believe this is a much-needed and innovative initiative.

Sincerely

Doris Eggerding, MD
University of Oregon

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One Response to “LETTERS OF SUPPORT vs. COMMITMENT”

  1. The 2nd example is light years better than the 1st (weak) one. I also like your advise in your Grantseeker Tips Newsletter # 348 that “letters of commitment should address collaborator roles before, during, and after the proposed project.” Great advise!

    ~Phil

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